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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
want to start with house speaker, john boehner. he was saying on wednesday he was optimistic about a deal. >> republicans are committed to continuing to work with the president to come to an agreement to avert the so-called fiscal cliff. optimistic that we can continue to work together to avert this crisis and sooner rather than later. >> very next day, boehner is suddenly grim, talks having accomplished a thing. >> no substantive progress has been made in the talks between the white house and the house over the last two weeks. this is not a game. jobs are on the line. the american economy is on the line. and this is a moment for adult leadership. campaign-style rallies and leaks in the press are not the way to get things done here in washington. >> all right. susan, you're looking at the monitor and looking at his body language. what is it telling you? >> well, he's an intense guy to begin with. but when he's emphasizing a point, you see his eyebrows flash up, a quick little flash. it's a micro-expression. after that. you see his eyebrows pull together in frustration and anger. no
he's got an obligation to send one to the congress. >> so that was speaker boehner obviously flanked by republicans. we'll get you that sound bite from the president because i want to make sure you hear both sides. here is the question i'm hearing people ask. if we go off the cliff here, how big of a hit will we take on taxs? stand by because i'm good to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, the fiscal policy reporter for the washington post. so, laurie, welcome to you here. and your paper this morning, you ran through a couple of tax scenarios which were pretty palletable so we want to show our view whaeers what you ran through. let me run through two. we'll look at this first one. so everybody take a look at this graphic. this is scenario number one, married couple, two kids, one in college, combined income of $137,000. you see the numbers here first under the democrats' plan, passed by the senate, not by the house, they would see their taxes rise 2500 bucks a year. just below that, the republican plan, passed by the house in august,
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)

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